Argentina is one of the most visited countries in South America, and it’s easy to see why. The country is home to bustling metropolises and peaceful wildernesses, gushing waterfalls and towering mountains, as well as wildlife-rich wetlands, magnificent architecture, rich culture, and world-famous steakhouses. It has everything you might want from South America.

Nonetheless, Argentina is a sizable country, clocking in at a whopping 3800 kilometres (2360 miles) from north to south. Our favorite 12 destinations, from national parks sculpted by glaciers to vineyards in the shadow of the Andes, are listed here to help people who aren’t sure where to begin narrow down their options.

Top 8 Places To Visit In Argentina

Contents

Top 8 Places To Visit In Argentina

One of Argentina’s biggest draws is the country’s varied landscape. It includes a wide range of environments, from arid deserts to steamy jungles, sandy beaches to mountainous landscapes.

Cultural, artistic, and architectural traditions in Argentina are equally as varied as the country’s geography, which ranges from the subtropical north to the subantarctic regions of picturesque Patagonia in the south.

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1. Buenos Aires

Buenos Aires has everything you might want from a large city experience, from sultry tango clubs to cacophonous football stadiums, from picturesque barrios to historic cemeteries, from world-class museums to rowdy nightlife.

In particular, Buenos Aires has excellent dining options. It is home to some of the world’s best steakhouses (parrillas), including the 50 Best 2020 Latin America’s Best Restaurant Don Julio. Every block seems to have at least one ice cream shop, and there are restaurants serving cuisines as diverse as Armenian and Peruvian.

2. The Pampas

The Pampas, or central Argentina’s flat, rich grasslands, are synonymous with gaucho (cowboy) culture and the cattle sector. San Antonio de Areco is a great place to get a feel for rural life thanks to its museum and yearly Dia de la Tradición celebration, which celebrate all things gaucho.

The Pampas are best experienced by spending a few nights at an estancia (ranch), where activities like horseback riding, polo instruction, and traditional Argentina barbecues can be enjoyed (barbecues).

3. Buenos Aires Province

The Atlantic coast south of Buenos Aires is littered with pleasant coastal resorts, despite Argentina’s less-than-famous reputation as a beach destination. Smaller, quieter, and more pleasant areas of beach can be found away from the loud and brash Mar del Plata.

Sunbathers and inexperienced surfers alike will enjoy the beaches at Cariló, Mar de las Pampas, and Mar Azul, all of which are backed by trees. While visiting the beaches of the province of Buenos Aires is possible via bus, it is much more convenient to rent a car.

4. Iguazú Falls

Both Iguazu National Park in Argentina and Iguaçu National Park in Brazil protect the spectacular Iguaz Falls that straddle the boundary between the two countries. These massive waterfalls are one of South America’s most breathtaking natural attractions, so much so that UNESCO has designated them a World Heritage Site.

There is a system of walkways and viewing platforms, some of which are located at the base of the falls in a region known as the Devil’s Throat, that allows visitors to go very close to these roaring waterfalls.

5. Perito Moreno Glacier

El Calafate, Patagonia, is the primary hub for travelers visiting Los Glaciares National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The town is home to a wide variety of hotels and other tourist services.

The town serves as a starting point for tours to the park’s several glaciers, the most prominent of which being the Perito Moreno Glacier, a spectacular ice creation 30 kilometers long (and the world’s third-largest freshwater reserve) and located just 78 kilometers from the town itself.

6. Tierra del Fuego National Park

From the Beagle Channel to the Chilean border and up to Lago Kami in the north, Tierra del Fuego National Park encompasses an enormous 156,000 acres. It’s a hiker’s dream come true with routes for every skill level.

Hikers and explorers leave the town of Ushuaia to explore the park’s stunning landscapes, which range from big waterfalls and dense forests to mountains and exquisite glacier-fed lakes like Roca and Fagnano.

Senda Costera, a coastal walk leading from Ensenada Bay to Lake Roca, is one of the most well-known paths due to the abundance of wildlife, including Andean condors, that can be seen along the way.

7. Puerto Madryn and the Valdés Peninsula

Puerto Madryn is located in one of the safest areas of the Patagonian coast, on the banks of Golfo Nuevo. The city’s Welsh founders made it what it is today: a famous cruise destination because to its deep-water port and plenty of environmental reserves.

Water sports aficionados, especially windsurfers who relish the challenge of the strong Patagonian winds, flock to its rocky coastline. The Valdez Peninsula is a UNESCO World Heritage Site recognized for its exceptional biodiversity and a haven for outdoor enthusiasts.

8. Ushuaia: The End of the World

Patagonia, located in southern Argentina, is well-known for its breathtaking scenery, which includes the Andes and extensive plains and plateaus. Ushuaia is the starting point for the vast majority of expeditions in this region.

This town on the Beagle Channel is on the edge of the Tierra del Fuego National Park, known for its spectacular scenery and diverse flora and fauna, and was founded as a penal colony in the early 20th century; today, it serves as a popular departure point for trips to Antarctica and around Cape Horn.

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Conclusion

One of Argentina’s biggest draws is the country’s varied landscape. It includes a wide range of environments, from arid deserts to steamy jungles, sandy beaches to mountainous landscapes.

Cultural, artistic, and architectural traditions in Argentina are equally as varied as the country’s geography, which ranges from the subtropical north to the subantarctic regions of picturesque Patagonia in the south.